“The grace of patience” by Charles Spurgeon

“Be satisfied as you are, and do not wish to choose another man’s cross. Christ says, ‘Take up the cross, and follow me. He does not say, ‘Desire to have another man’s cross.’ Observe, too, that Christ does not say, ‘Murmur at your cross.’ That is the very reverse of taking it up.

As long as a man is alive, and out of hell, he cannot have any cause to complain. Be he where he may,—be he placed in the most abject position conceivable,—the man is better off than he deserves to be. Let not a single murmur, then, ever escape our lips.

Blessed is the grace of patience, but hard is it to be acquired. May the Lord, of His infinite mercy, teach us to bear all His holy will, and bear it cheerfully, and so to take up our cross for Jesus’ sake!”

–Charles H. Spurgeon, “A Procession of Cross-Bearers,” The Metropolitan Tabernacle Pulpit Sermons, Vol. LI (London: Passmore & Alabaster, 1905), 365. Spurgeon preached this sermon on Mark 10:21 on May 2, 1875 at the Metropolitan Tabernacle in London.

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Filed under Charles Spurgeon, Christian Theology, Jesus Christ, Patience, Puritanical, Quotable Quotes, The Gospel

One response to ““The grace of patience” by Charles Spurgeon

  1. Pingback: “The grace of patience” by Charles Spurgeon | Prisoner of HOPE

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