Category Archives: Banner of Truth

“God is a friend you cannot lose” by Thomas Watson

“Are you mourning someone close to you? Look up to heaven and draw comfort from there; your best kindred are above.

‘When my father and my mother forsake me, then the Lord will take me up,’ (Psalm 27:10).

God will be with you in the hour of death: ‘though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, thou art with me,’ (Psalm 23:4).

Other friends you cannot keep. God is a friend you cannot lose.

He will be your guide in life, your hope in death, and your reward after death.”

–Thomas Watson, The Godly Man’s Picture Drawn with a Scripture-Pencil (Carlisle, PA: Banner of Truth, 1666/2003), 121.

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Filed under Banner of Truth, Christian Theology, Death, Jesus Christ, Puritanical, Quotable Quotes, Resurrection, The Gospel, Thomas Watson

“Christ is more full of goodness than the sun is full of light” by Thomas Watson

“Christ has not only a few drops, or rays, but is more full of goodness than the sun if full of light. He has the fullness of the Godhead (Col. 2:9).”

–Thomas Watson, The Godly Man’s Picture Drawn with a Scripture-Pencil (Carlisle, PA: Banner of Truth, 1666/2003), 48.

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“God loves a humble soul” by Thomas Watson

“God loves a humble soul. It is not our high birth, but our low hearts God delights in.

A humble spirit is in God’s view: ‘To this man will I look, even to him that is poor, and of a contrite spirit,’ (Isa. 66:2).

A humble heart is God’s palace: ‘I dwell in the high and holy place, with him also that is of an humble spirit,’ (Isa. 57:15).

A humble heart glories in this: that it is the presence chamber of the great King.”

–Thomas Watson, The Godly Man’s Picture Drawn with a Scripture-Pencil (Carlisle, PA: Banner of Truth, 1666/2003), 84-85.

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Filed under Banner of Truth, Christian Theology, Humility, Jesus Christ, Puritanical, Quotable Quotes, The Gospel, Thomas Watson

“A humble man is willing to have his name and gifts eclipsed” by Thomas Watson

“A humble man is willing to have his name and gifts eclipsed so that God’s glory may be increased. He is content to be outshined by others in gifts and esteem, so that the crown of Christ may shine the brighter.

This is the humble man’s motto, ‘Let me decrease, let Christ increase.’ It is his desire that Christ should be exalted, and if this be thus effected, whoever is the instrument, he rejoices.

‘Some preach Christ out of envy,’ (Phil. 1:17). They preached to take away some of Paul’s hearers. ‘Well,’ says he, ‘Christ is preached, and I therein do rejoice,’ (1:18).

A humble Christian is content to be laid aside if God has any other tools to work with which may bring Him more glory.”

–Thomas Watson, The Godly Man’s Picture Drawn with a Scripture-Pencil (Carlisle, PA: Banner of Truth, 1666/2003), 81.

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Filed under Banner of Truth, Christian Theology, Humility, Jesus Christ, Puritanical, Quotable Quotes, The Gospel, Thomas Watson

“It is free mercy that every day keeps Hell and my soul asunder” by Thomas Brooks

“‘Blessed are the merciful for they shall obtain mercy,’ (Matthew 5:7). Mercy is a commiserating of another man’s misery in our hearts, or a sorrow for another man’s distress, or a heart-grieving for another man’s grief, arising out of an unfeigned love unto the party afflicted.

Or more plainly thus: mercy is a pitying of another man’s misery, with a desire and endeavor to help him to the uttermost of our ability. The Hebrew for godly, חסד, chasid, signifies gracious, merciful.

The more godly any man is, the more merciful that man will be. ‘Blessed are the merciful,’ that is, blessed are they that show mercy to others, out of a deep sense of the mercy of God to them in Christ.

Blessed are such who show mercy out of love to mercy, out of a delight in mercy.

Blessed are such as show mercy out of love and obedience to the God of mercy.

Blessed are such as show mercy to men in misery, upon the account of the image of God, the glory of God that is stamped upon them.

Blessed are such as extend their piety and mercy, not only to men’s bodies, but also to their precious and immortal souls.

Soul-mercy is the chief of mercies. The soul is the most precious jewel in all the world; it is a vessel of honour, it is a spark of glory, it is a bud of eternity, it is the price of blood, it is beautified with the image of God, it is adorned with the grace of God, and it is clothed with the righteousness of God.

Such are blessed as show mercy to others, from gracious motives and considerations.

It is free mercy that every day keeps Hell and my soul asunder.

It is mercy that daily pardons my sins.

It is mercy that supplies all my inward and outward wants.

It is mercy that preserves, and feeds, and clothes my outward man.

It is mercy that renews, strengthens, and prospers my inward man.

It is mercy that has kept me many times from committing such and such sins.

It is mercy that has kept me many a time from falling before such and such temptations.

It is mercy that has many a time preserved me from being swallowed up by such and such inward and outward afflictions.

Such as show mercy out of a design to exalt and glorify the God of mercy, such who show most mercy to them to whom God shows most mercy: these are blessed, and shall obtain mercy.”

–Thomas Brooks, “A Cabinet of Jewels,” The Complete Works of Thomas Brooks, Volume 3, ed. Alexander Balloch Grosart (Edinburgh; London; Dublin: James Nichol; James Nisbet and Co.; G. Herbert, 1866), 271-272.

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Filed under Banner of Truth, Christian Theology, Jesus Christ, Mercy, Puritanical, Quotable Quotes, The Gospel, Thomas Brooks

“Pray for the worst, the hardest, and the most unbelieving” by J.C. Ryle

“Do we know what it is to pray for ourselves? This, after all, is the first question for self-inquiry. The man who never speaks to God about his own soul, can know nothing of praying for others.

He is as yet Godless, Christless, and hopeless, and has to learn the very rudiments of religion. Let him awake, and call upon God.

But do we pray for ourselves? Then let us take heed that we pray for others also.

Let us beware of selfish prayers,—prayers which are wholly taken up with our own affairs, and in which there is no place for other souls beside our own.

Let us name all whom we love before God continually.

Let us pray for all,—the worst, the hardest, and the most unbelieving.

Let us continue praying for them year after year, in spite of their continued unbelief.

God’s time of mercy may be a distant one. Our eyes may not see an answer to our intercessions. The answer may not come for ten, fifteen, or twenty years.

It may not come till we have exchanged prayer for praise, and are far away from this world. But while we live, let us pray for others.

It is the greatest kindness we can do to anyone, to speak for him to our Lord Jesus Christ. The day of judgment will show that one of the greatest links in drawing some souls to God, has been the intercessory prayer of friends.”

–J.C. Ryle, Practical Religion: Being Plain Papers on the Daily Duties, Experience, Dangers, and Privileges of Professing Christians (Carlisle, PA: Banner of Truth, 1878/2013), 116-117.

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Filed under Banner of Truth, Christian Theology, Eschatology, J.C. Ryle, Jesus Christ, Prayer, Preaching, Puritanical, Quotable Quotes, The Gospel

“The righteousness of Christ” by Thomas Brooks

“Though men may accuse you, judge and condemn you, yet know for your support, that you are acquitted before the throne of God. However you may stand in the eyes of men, as full of nothing but faults, persons made up of nothing but sin, yet are you clear in the eyes of God.

God looks upon weak saints in the Son of His love, and sees them all lovely. They are as the tree of Paradise, ‘fair to his eye, and pleasant to his taste,’ (Gen. 3:6).

Ah, poor souls! You are apt to look upon your spots and blots, and to cry out with the leper not only ‘Unclean, unclean!’ but ‘Undone, undone!’

Well, forever remember this, that your persons stand before God in the righteousness of Christ, upon which account you always appear, before the throne of God, without fault. You are all fair, and there is no spot in you.”

–Thomas Brooks, “The Unsearchable Riches of Christ,” The Complete Works of Thomas Brooks, Volume 3, ed. Alexander Balloch Grosart (Carlisle, PA: Banner of Truth, 1866/2001), 70.

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Filed under Banner of Truth, Bible, Christian Theology, grace, Jesus Christ, Justification, Preaching, Puritanical, Quotable Quotes, The Gospel, Thomas Brooks