Category Archives: Communion with God

“What will we do for Him, if we will not feast with Him?” by Richard Sibbes

“Christ hath both will, and skill, and power, and authority to feed us to everlasting life, for the Father sent Him forth, and sealed Him to that purpose.

All the springs of our joy are from Him (Psalm 87:7). Our duty is to accept of Christ’s inviting of us.

What will we do for Him, if we will not feast with Him?”

–Richard Sibbes, “Bowels Opened: or, A Discovery of the Near and Dear Love, Union and Communion Betwixt Christ and the Church, and Consequently Betwixt Him and Every Believing Soul, Delivered in Diverse Sermons on the Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Chapters of the Canticles,” The Works of Richard Sibbes, Volume 2 (ed. Alexander Balloch Grosart; Carlisle, PA: Banner of Truth, 1639/2001), 2: 34.

Leave a comment

Filed under Christian Theology, Communion with God, Jesus Christ, Puritanical, Quotable Quotes, Religious Affections, Richard Sibbes, Sanctification, The Gospel

“Why would we not celebrate God for His greatest greatness?” by Petrus Van Mastricht

“The infinite greatness of God supplies an argument for us to make Him great with infinite praises (Luke 1:46).

For He is (1) great, and therefore, greatly to be praised.

Indeed, He is (2) most great, infinitely great: ‘and His greatness is unsearchable.’

And also (3) He is the only One who is such (Isa. 40:12; 15, 17).

Indeed, (4) great in so many ways; great, in fact, in all ways: in His essence, His presence, His duration, His wisdom, His strength and power, His grace and mercy (Ps. 147:5).

And in this greatness He is (5) above the gods, whether earthly, such as kings and magistrates, or heavenly (at lease in the opinion of the pagans), the false gods; and above all gods (2 Chron. 2:5; Ps. 135:5).

For if, then we celebrate the sun for its great greatness, and the heavens for their greater greatness, why would we not celebrate God for His greatest greatness, for His infinite greatness?

Let us therefore make Him great (1) in our heart (Ps. 103:1; Luke 1:46), by always thinking of Him great things, indeed the greatest of things, for He is the One who is infinitely greater than all our thoughts (Eph. 3:20); by esteeming as great, indeed, as most great, both Him and all that is His– His presence, favor, promises, worship– in such a way that we approach Him and all things of His with an infinite (that is, an insatiable) appetite and desire (Ps. 84:1-2).

(2) In our mouth, that with a great voice, in the presence of others, we celebrate Him who is infinitely great (Ps. 103:8), indeed that we call others to celebrate Him with us (Ps. 103:20-22).

Finally, (3) in our work, that we do it (a) with profound reverence for the infinite deity, and with fear of offending Him, even in the least things, because He is the most great King (Mal. 1:14; Deut. 10:17; Neh. 1:5; Dan. 9:4). (b) By a careful zeal for obeying and pleasing Him (2 Cor. 5:9). (c) By an infinite desire or concern for possessing and enjoying Him (Ps. 73:25).”

–Petrus Van Mastricht, Theoretical-Practical Theology: Faith in the Triune God, Volume 2, Trans. Todd Rester, Ed. Joel Beeke (Grand Rapids, MI: Reformation Heritage, 2019), 2: 190.

Leave a comment

Filed under Bible, Christian Theology, Communion with God, God's Excellencies, Jesus Christ, Petrus Van Mastricht, Preaching, Puritanical, Quotable Quotes, The Gospel, Worship

“Without losing Himself, God can give Himself” by Herman Bavinck

“A deep chasm separates God’s being from that of all creatures.

It is a mark of God’s greatness that He can condescend to the level of His creatures and that, though transcendent, He can dwell immanently in all created beings.

Without losing Himself, God can give Himself, and, while absolutely maintaining His immutability, He can enter into an infinite number of relations to His creatures.”

–Herman Bavinck, Reformed Dogmatics: God and Creation, Vol. 2, Ed. John Bolt, and Trans. John Vriend (Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Academic, 2004), 2: 159.

Leave a comment

Filed under Christian Theology, Communion with God, doctrine of God, Herman Bavinck, immutability, Jesus Christ, Quotable Quotes, The Gospel, Transcendance

“Give Me thy burden, give Me all thy sins” by John Owen

“How do the saints hold communion with Christ as to their acceptation with God?

They hearken to the voice of Christ calling them to Him with their burden, “Come unto Me, all ye that are weary and heavy laden.’

‘Come with your burdens; come, thou poor soul, with thy guilt of sin.’ Why? What to do?

‘Why, this is mine,’ saith Christ, ‘this agreement I made with My Father, that I should come, and take thy sins, and bear them away: they were my lot. Give Me thy burden, give Me all thy sins. Thou knowest not what to do with them; I know how to dispose of them well enough, so that God shall be glorified, and thy soul delivered.”

They lay down their sins at the cross of Christ, upon His shoulders.

This is faith’s great and bold venture upon the grace, faithfulness, and truth of God, to stand by the cross and say:

“Ah! He is bruised for my sins, and wounded for my transgressions, and the chastisement of my peace is upon Him. He is thus made sin for me. Here I give up my sins to Him that is able to bear them, to undergo them. He requires it of my hands, that I should be content that He should undertake for them; and that I heartily consent unto.”

This is every day’s work; I know not how any peace can be maintained with God without it. If it be the work of souls to receive Christ, as made sin for us, we must receive Him as one that takes our sins upon Him.

Not as though He died any more, or suffered any more; but as the faith of the saints of old made that present and done before their eyes which had not yet come to pass (Heb. 11:1), so faith now makes that present which was accomplished and past many generations ago.

This it is to know Christ crucified.”

–John Owen, The Works of John Owen, Volume 2: Communion With God (ed. William H. Goold; Carlisle, PA: Banner of Truth, 1850-53/1997), 194.

Leave a comment

Filed under Bible, Christian Theology, Communion with God, Jesus Christ, John Owen, Puritanical, Quotable Quotes, The Gospel

“Aslan likes to be asked” by C.S. Lewis

“Now they were over the top of the cliffs and in a few minutes the valley land of Narnia had sunk out of sight behind them. They were flying over a wild country of steep hills and dark forests, still following the course of the river.

The really big mountains loomed ahead. But the sun was now in the travelers’ eyes and they couldn’t see things very clearly in that direction.

For the sun sank lower and lower till the western sky was all like one great furnace full of melted gold; and it set at last behind a jagged peak which stood up against the brightness as sharp and flat as if it were cut out of cardboard.

“It’s none too warm up here,” said Polly.

“And my wings are beginning to ache,” said Fledge. “There’s no sign of the valley with a Lake in it, like what Aslan said. What about coming down and looking out for a decent spot to spend the night in? We shan’t reach that place tonight.”

“Yes, and surely it’s about time for supper?” said Digory.

So Fledge came lower and lower. As they came down nearer to the earth and among the hills, the air grew warmer and after traveling so many hours with nothing to listen to but the beat of Fledge’s wings, it was nice to hear the homely and earthy noises again—the chatter of the river on its stony bed and the creaking of trees in the light wind.

A warm, good smell of sun-baked earth and grass and flowers came up to them. At last Fledge alighted. Digory rolled off and helped Polly to dismount. Both were glad to stretch their stiff legs.

The valley in which they had come down was in the heart of the mountains; snowy heights, one of them looking rose-red in the reflections of the sunset, towered above them.

“I am hungry,” said Digory.

“Well, tuck in,” said Fledge, taking a big mouthful of grass.

Then he raised his head, still chewing and with bits of grass sticking out on each side of his mouth like whiskers, and said, “Come on, you two. Don’t be shy. There’s plenty for us all.”

“But we can’t eat grass,” said Digory.

“H’m, h’m,” said Fledge, speaking with his mouth full. “Well— h’m— don’t know quite what you’ll do then. Very good grass too.”

Polly and Digory stared at one another in dismay.

“Well, I do think someone might have arranged about our meals,” said Digory.

“I’m sure Aslan would have, if you’d asked him,” said Fledge.

“Wouldn’t he know without being asked?” said Polly.

“I’ve no doubt he would,” said the Horse. “But I’ve a sort of idea he likes to be asked.”

–C.S. Lewis, The Magician’s Nephew: The Chronicles of Narnia (New York: HarperCollins, 1950), 86-87.

Leave a comment

Filed under Aslan, C.S. Lewis, Christian Theology, Communion with God, Faith, Humility, Jesus Christ, Literature, Narnia, Prayer, Puritanical, Quotable Quotes

“A deluge of self” by Stephen Charnock

“The whole little world of man is so overflowed with a deluge of self.”

–Stephen Charnock, “On Practical Atheism,” in The Existence and Attributes of God, in The Works of Stephen Charnock, Vol. 1 (Carlisle, PA: Banner of Truth, 1681/2010), 1: 225.

Leave a comment

Filed under Banner of Truth, Bible, Christian Theology, Communion with God, doctrine of God, God the Creator, God the Father, Good News, grace, Heaven, Jesus Christ, Preaching, Puritanical, Quotable Quotes, Sin, Stephen Charnock, The Gospel, Worldliness

“Altogether worthy” by Augustine of Hippo (A.D. 354-430)

“I know, O Lord, and do with all humility acknowledge myself an object altogether unworthy of Your love; but I am sure, You are an object altogether worthy of mine.

I am not good enough to serve You, but You have a right to the best service I can pay.

Do then impart to me some of that excellence, and that shall supply my own want of worth.

Help me to cease from sin according to Your will, that I may be capable of doing You service according to my duty.

Enable me so to guard and govern myself, so to begin and finish my course that, when the race of life is run, I may sleep in peace and rest in You.

Be with me to the end, that my sleep may be rest indeed, my rest perfect security, and that security a blessed eternity.”

–Augustine of Hippo, Ancient Christian Devotional: Lectionary Cycle C, Volume 3, Eds. Cindy Crosby, Thomas C. Oden (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 2009), 70.

Leave a comment

Filed under Augustine, Christian Theology, Church Fathers, Communion with God, Jesus Christ, Prayer, Quotable Quotes, Sanctification, Sin