Category Archives: Priest Most High

“Jesus can understand you” by J.C. Ryle

“If any reader of this paper desires salvation, and wants to know what to do, I advise him to go this very day to the Lord Jesus Christ, in the first private place he can find, and entreat Him in prayer to save his soul.

Tell Him that you have heard that He receives sinners, and has said, ‘Him that cometh unto Me I will in no wise cast out.’ (John 6:37.)

Tell Him that you are a poor vile sinner, and that you come to Him on the faith of His own invitation.

Tell Him you put yourself wholly and entirely in His hands,—that you feel vile and helpless, and hopeless in yourself,—and that except He saves you, you have no hope to be saved at all.

Beseech Him to deliver you from the guilt, the power, and the consequences of sin.

Beseech Him to pardon you and wash you in His own blood.

Beseech Him to give you a new heart, and plant the Holy Spirit in your soul.

Beseech Him to give you grace, and faith, and will, and power to be His disciple and servant from this day for ever.

Yes: go this very day, and tell these things to the Lord Jesus Christ, if you really are in earnest about your soul.

Tell Him in your own way and your own words. If a doctor came to see you when sick you could tell him where you felt pain. If your soul really feels its disease you can surely find something to tell Christ.

Doubt not His willingness to save you, because you are a sinner. It is Christ’s office to save sinners. He says Himself, ‘I came not to call the righteous, but sinners to repentance.’ (Luke 5:32.)

Wait not, because you feel unworthy. Wait for nothing: wait for nobody. Waiting comes from the devil.

Just as you are, go to Christ. The worse you are, the more need you have to apply to Him. You will never mend yourself by staying away.

Fear not because your prayer is stammering, your words feeble, and your language poor. Jesus can understand you.

Just as a mother understands the first babblings of her infant, so does the blessed Saviour understand sinners. He can read a sigh, and see a meaning in a groan.

Despair not, because you do not get an answer immediately. While you are speaking, Jesus is listening. If He delays an answer, it is only for wise reasons, and to try if you are in earnest.

Pray on, and the answer will surely come. Though it tarry, wait for it: it will surely come at last.

If you have any desire to be saved, remember the advice I have given you this day. Act upon it honestly and heartily, and you shall be saved.”

–J.C. Ryle, Practical Religion: Being Plain Papers on the Daily Duties, Experience, Dangers, and Privileges of Professing Christians (London: Charles Murray, 1900), 85–86.

2 Comments

Filed under Christian Theology, J.C. Ryle, Jesus Christ, Mercy, Prayer, Priest Most High, Puritanical, Quotable Quotes, Repentance, salvation, The Gospel

“The almighty sympathy of Jesus” by J.C. Ryle

“We learn from this passage, that our Lord Jesus Christ is exceedingly patient and pitiful in dealing with His own people. We see the disciples on this occasion showing great want of faith, and giving way to most unseemly fears.

They forgot their Master’s miracles and care for them in days gone by. They thought of nothing but their present peril. They awoke our Lord hastily, and cried, ‘carest thou not that we perish?’

We see our Lord dealing most gently and tenderly with them. He gives them no sharp reproof. He makes no threat of casting them off, because of their unbelief. He simply asks the touching question, ‘Why are ye so fearful? How is it that ye have no faith?’

Let us mark well this lesson. The Lord Jesus is very pitiful and full of tender mercy. ‘As a father pitieth his children, even so the Lord pitieth them that fear Him.’ (Psalm 103:13)

He does not deal with believers according to their sins, nor reward them according to their iniquities. He sees their weakness. He is aware of their short-comings. He knows all the defects of their faith, and hope, and love, and courage.

And yet He will not cast them off. He bears with them continually. He loves them even to the end. He raises them when they fall. He restores them when they err.

His patience, like His love, is a patience that passeth knowledge. When He sees a heart right, it is His glory to pass over many a short-coming.

Let us leave these verses with the comfortable recollection that Jesus is not changed. His heart is still the same that it was when He crossed the sea of Galilee and stilled the storm.

High in heaven at the right hand of God, Jesus is still sympathizing,—still almighty,—still pitiful and still patient towards His people.

Let us be more charitable and patient towards our brethren in the faith. They may err in many things, but if Jesus has received them and can bear with them, surely we may bear with them too.

Let us be more hopeful about ourselves. We may be very weak, and frail, and unstable; but if we can truly say that we do come to Christ and believe on Him, we may take comfort.

The question for conscience to answer is not, ‘Are we like the angels? are we perfect as we shall be in heaven?’ The question is, ‘Are we real and true in our approaches to Christ? Do we truly repent and believe?'”

–J.C. Ryle, Expository Thoughts on Mark (London: William Hunt, 1859), 85-87. Ryle is commenting on Mark 4:35-41. [HT: Nick Gardner]

Leave a comment

Filed under Christian Theology, J.C. Ryle, Jesus Christ, Mercy, Patience, Preaching, Priest Most High, Puritanical, Quotable Quotes, Repentance, Sanctification, Sin, The Gospel

“His mercy is without end” by Herman Bavinck

“The goodness of God, when shown to those in misery, is called mercy (רָחֲמִים, σπλαγχνα, viscera, misericordia; NT: ἐλεος, οἰκτιρμος).

Time and again Scripture refers to this mercy of God (Exod. 34:6; Deut. 4:31; 2 Chron. 30:9; Ps. 86:15; 103:8; 111:3; 112:4; 145:8), as it contrasts with the attitude of humans (2 Sam. 24:14; Prov. 12:10; Dan. 9:9, 18).

His mercy is great (2 Sam. 24:14; Ps. 119:156; Neh. 9:19; Ps. 51:12), without end (Lam. 3:22), tender like that of a father (Ps. 103:13), is shown to thousands (Exod. 20:6), and after periods of chastisement returns (Isa. 14:1; 49:13ff.; 54:8; 55:7; 60:10; Jer. 12:15; 30:18; 31:20; Hos. 2:22; Mic. 7:19).

In the New Testament God, the Father of mercies (2 Cor. 1:3), has revealed His mercy in Christ (Luke 1:50ff.), who is a merciful high priest (Matt. 18:27; 20:34; etc.; Heb. 2:17) and further shows the riches of His mercy (Eph. 2:4) in the salvation of believers (Rom. 9:23; 11:30; 1 Cor. 7:25; 2 Cor. 4:1; 1 Tim. 1:13; Heb. 4:16.)”

–Herman Bavinck, Ed. John Bolt and trans. John Vriend, Reformed Dogmatics, Volume 2: God and Creation (Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Academic, 2004), 213.

Leave a comment

Filed under Christian Theology, God the Father, Herman Bavinck, Jesus Christ, Mercy, Priest Most High, Puritanical, Quotable Quotes, The Gospel

“One of us to plead for us” by Jonathan Edwards

“Christ calls us brethren and is one of us. How should we be encouraged when we have such a Mediator! ‘Tis one of us that is to plead for us, one that God from love to us has received into His own person from among us.”

–Jonathan Edwards, “Entry 183: Christ’s Love” in The “Miscellanies”: Entry Nos. a-z, aa-zz, 1-500, in The Works of Jonathan Edwards, Vol. 13, Ed. Harry S. Stout (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1994), 329-330. This entry may be read here in its entirety.

Leave a comment

Filed under Christian Theology, Incarnation, Jesus Christ, Jonathan Edwards, Priest Most High, Puritanical, Quotable Quotes, The Gospel

“We can talk with Him” by J.C. Ryle

“While Christ is absent believers must ask much in prayer. It is written, ‘Hitherto have ye asked nothing in My name: ask and ye shall receive, that your joy may be full.’

We may well believe that up to this time the disciples had never realized their Master’s full dignity. They had certainly never understood that He was the one Mediator between God and man, in whose name and for whose sake they were to put up their prayers. Here they are distinctly told that henceforward they are to ‘ask in His name.’

Nor can we doubt that our Lord would have all His people, in every age, understand that the secret of comfort during His absence is to be instant in prayer. He would have us know that if we cannot see Him with our bodily eyes any longer, we can talk with Him, and through Him have special access to God.

‘Ask and ye shall receive,’ He proclaims to all His people in every age; ‘and your joy shall be full.’

Let the lesson sink down deeply into our hearts. Of all the list of Christian duties there is none to which there is such abounding encouragement as prayer. It is a duty which concerns all. High and low, rich and poor, learned and unlearned,—all must pray. It is a duty for which all are accountable.

All cannot read, or hear, or sing; but all who have the spirit of adoption can pray. Above all, it is a duty in which everything depends on the heart and motive within. Our words may be feeble and ill-chosen, and our language broken and ungrammatical, and unworthy to be written down.

But if the heart be right, it matters not. He that sits in heaven can spell out the meaning of every petition sent up in the name of Jesus, and can make the asker know and feel that he receives.

‘If we know these things, happy are we if we do them.’ Let prayer in the name of Jesus be a daily habit with us every morning and evening of our lives. Keeping up that habit, we shall find strength for duty, comfort in trouble, guidance in perplexity, hope in sickness, and support in death.

Faithful is He that promised, ‘Your joy shall be full;’ and He will keep His word, if we ask in prayer.”

–J.C. Ryle, Expository Thoughts on John, Vol. 3 (New York: Robert Carter & Brothers, 1880), 151-152.

Leave a comment

Filed under Bible, Christian Theology, J.C. Ryle, Jesus Christ, Prayer, Priest Most High, Puritanical, Quotable Quotes, The Gospel

“The intercession of Christ” by Carl Trueman

“When we turn to the intercession of Christ at the Father’s right hand in the present age, we must not think of Christ as somehow begging, cajoling, or bribing the Father to be merciful.

Rather, we should think of the heavenly session of Christ as involving the mutual delight of Father, Son and Holy Spirit in the accomplished work of the Incarnate God and as rejoicing in the great work of salvation.

The Father does not hear the Son’s intercessions unwillingly or impatiently; He takes pleasure in hearing the Son and in granting His requests, for in a very real sense the intercessions of the Son are the deepest intentions of the Father as well.

The very presence before Him of the Son with His wounded hands and side is a source of immeasurable satisfaction, pleasure and joy. This should fill believers with confidence as they pray.

We need no intermediary other than that which we already have in God Incarnate.”

–Carl Trueman, “Seated at the Right Hand of the Father,” Reformation21. As cited on: http://www.reformation21.org/blog/2011/05/seated-at-the-right-hand-of-th.php (Accessed May 9, 2011).

1 Comment

Filed under Carl Trueman, Christian Theology, Jesus Christ, Priest Most High, Quotable Quotes, The Gospel

“Jesus is praying for me” by Robert Murray M’Cheyne

“I ought to study Christ as a living Saviour more,—as a Shepherd, carrying the sheep He finds,—as a King, reigning in and over the souls He has redeemed,—as a Captain, fighting with those who fight with me (Psalm 35), as One who has engaged to bring me through all temptations and trials, however impossible to flesh and blood.

I am often tempted to say, ‘How can this Man save us? How can Christ in heaven deliver me from lusts which I feel raging in me, and nets I feel enclosing me?’ This is the father of lies again! ‘He is able to save unto the uttermost.’

I ought to study Christ as an Intercessor. He prayed most for Peter, who was to be most tempted. I am on His breastplate.

If I could hear Christ praying for me in the next room, I would not fear a million of enemies. Yet the distance makes no difference; He is praying for me.”

–Robert Murray McCheyne and Andrew A. Bonar, Memoir and Remains of the Rev. Robert Murray McCheyne (Edinburgh; London: Oliphant Anderson & Ferrier, 1894), 158.

1 Comment

Filed under Bible, Christian Theology, Jesus as Priest, Jesus Christ, Prayer, Priest Most High, Puritanical, Quotable Quotes, Robert Murray M'Cheyne, The Gospel