Tag Archives: Charles Spurgeon

“We shall have all that His great heart can give us” by Charles Spurgeon

“Jesus says, ‘I go to prepare a place for you.’ (John 14:2) Brethren, He will do it well, for He knows all about us.

He knows what will give us the most happiness,—and what will best develop all our spiritual faculties forever.

He loves us, too, so well that, as the preparing is left to Him, I know that He will prepare us nothing second-rate, nothing that could possibly be excelled.

We shall have the best of the best, and much of it. We shall have all that even His great heart can give us.

Nothing will be stinted, for, as He is preparing it, it will be a right royal and divine preparation.

If, when the prodigal came back to his father, there was the preparation of the fatted calf, and the music and dancing, and the gold ring and the best robe, what will be the preparation when we do not come home as prodigals, but as the bride prepared for her husband, or as the beloved children, without spot, or wrinkle, or any such thing, coming home to the Father who shall see His own image in us, and rejoice over us with singing?

It is a grand place that Christ prepares, for never was there another such a lordly host as He is.

It is a mansion of delights that He prepares, for never was there another architect with thought so magnificent as His, and never were other hands so skilled at quarrying living stones, and putting them one upon another, as His hands have ever been.

This thought ought to cheer us much. It must be something very wonderful that Christ prepares as a fit place for His people.”

–Charles H. Spurgeon, “‘A Prepared Place for a Prepared People,’” in The Metropolitan Tabernacle Pulpit Sermons (vol. 47; London: Passmore & Alabaster, 1901), 47: 519. This sermon has been reprinted in No Tears in Heaven.

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“Nothing puts life into men like a dying Saviour” by Charles Spurgeon

“The best preaching is, ‘We preach Christ crucified.’

The best living is, ‘We are crucified with Christ.’

The best man is a crucified man.

The best style is a crucified style: may we drop into it!

The more we live beholding our Lord’s unutterable griefs, and understanding how He has fully put away our sin, the more holiness shall we produce.

The more we dwell where the cries of Calvary can be heard, where we can view heaven, and earth, and Hell, all moved by His wondrous passion—the more noble will our lives become.

Nothing puts life into men like a dying Saviour.

Get you close to Christ, and carry the remembrance of Him about you from day to day, and you will do right royal deeds.

Come, let us slay sin, for Christ was slain.
Come, let us bury all our pride, for Christ was buried.
Come, let us rise to newness of life, for Christ has risen.

Let us be united with our crucified Lord in His one great object.
Let us live and die with Him, and then every action of our lives will be very beautiful.”

–Charles H. Spurgeon, “To Lovers of Jesus: An Example,” in The Metropolitan Tabernacle Pulpit Sermons, Vol. 31 (London: Passmore & Alabaster, 1885), 31: 202.

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“Humility, happiness, and holiness” by Charles Spurgeon

“There will be three effects of nearness to Jesus, all beginning with the letter hhumility, happiness, and holiness. May God give them to us!”

–Charles H. Spurgeon, “Christ Manifesting Himself to His People,” in The New Park Street Pulpit Sermons (vol. 1; London: Passmore & Alabaster, 1855), 1: 226.

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“Our sorrows shall have an end” by Charles Spurgeon

“Our longest sorrows have a close, and there is a bottom to the profoundest depths of our misery.

Our winters shall not frown forever; summer shall soon smile.

The tide shall not eternally ebb out; the floods retrace their march.

The night shall not hang its darkness for ever over our souls; the sun shall yet arise with healing beneath his wings.

The Lord turned again the captivity of Job.’ (Job 42:10) Our sorrows shall have an end when God has gotten His end in them.”

–Charles H. Spurgeon, “Intercessory Prayer,” in The Metropolitan Tabernacle Pulpit Sermons, Vol. 7 (London: Passmore & Alabaster, 1861), 7: 449.

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“The way to do a great deal” by Charles Spurgeon

“The way to do a great deal is to keep on doing a little. The way to do nothing at all is to be continually resolving that you will do everything.”

–Charles H. Spurgeon, “Luminous Words,” in The Metropolitan Tabernacle Pulpit Sermons, Vol. 43 (London: Passmore & Alabaster, 1897), 43: 618.

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“The zeal of Wilberforce” by Charles Spurgeon

“Brethren, we become zealous when we hear the cries and tears of the oppressed.

I think I see a senator standing on the floor of the House of Commons, pleading, in years gone by, the cause of Africa’s down-trodden sons.

I do not wonder at the zeal of Wilberforce, or the marvelous eloquence of Fox. What a cause they had!

They could hear the clanging of the fetters of the slaves, the sighs of prisoners, the shrieks of women, and this made them speak, for they burned with an indignation which carried them away.

Pity pulled up the sluices of their speech, and their souls ran out in mighty torrents of overwhelming eloquence.

Now, think, the Lord this day hears the sighs of the oppressed all over the world. He hears the sighs of the sorrowful.

And beyond that there comes up the daily cries of His elect, who day and night beseech His throne.

Oh! That we were more clamorous! Oh! That we were more intensely importunate! Oh! That we gave Him no rest until He would establish and make Jerusalem a praise on the earth.

For, remember the words of the Lord Jesus, how He said, ‘And shall not God avenge His own elect? Though they cry night and day unto Him, I tell you He will avenge them speedily.'”

–Charles H. Spurgeon, “The Zeal of the Lord,’” in The Metropolitan Tabernacle Pulpit Sermons, Vol. 60 (London: Passmore & Alabaster, 1914), 60: 545.

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“By God’s grace, I saved that man from suicide” by Charles Spurgeon

“Another form of strength comes of weakness, for by it our sympathy is educated. When you and I become weak, and are depressed in spirit, and our soul passes through the valley of the shadow of death, it is often on account of others.

One Sabbath morning, I preached from the text, ‘My God, My God, why hast Thou forsaken Me?’ and though I did not say so, yet I preached my own experience. I heard my own chains clank while I tried to preach to my fellow-prisoners in the dark.

But I could not tell why I was brought into such an awful horror of darkness, for which I condemned myself.

On the following Monday evening, a man came to see me who bore all the marks of despair upon his countenance. His hair seemed to stand upright, and his eyes were ready to start from their sockets.

He said to me, after a little parleying, ‘I never before, in my life, heard any man speak who seemed to know my heart. Mine is a terrible case; but on Sunday morning you painted me to the life, and preached as if you had been inside my soul.’

By God’s grace, I saved that man from suicide, and led him into gospel light and liberty; but I know I could not have done it if I had not myself been confined in the dungeon in which he lay.

I tell the story, brethren, because you sometimes may not understand your own experience, and the perfect people may condemn you for having it; but what know they of God’s servants?

You and I have to suffer much for the sake of the people of our charge. God’s sheep ramble very far, and we have to go after them; and sometimes the shepherds go where they themselves would never roam if they were not in pursuit of lost sheep.

You may be in Egyptian darkness, and you may wonder why such a horror chills your marrow; but you may be altogether in the pursuit of your calling, and be led of the Spirit to a position of sympathy with desponding minds.

Expect to grow weaker, brethren, that you may comfort the weak, and so may become masters in Israel in the judgment of others, while, in your own opinion, you are less than the least of all saints.”

–Charles H. Spurgeon, An All-Round Ministry: Addresses to Ministers and Students (Carlisle, PA: Banner of Truth, 1960), 221–222.

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