Tag Archives: Give us our daily bread

“Aslan likes to be asked” by C.S. Lewis

“Now they were over the top of the cliffs and in a few minutes the valley land of Narnia had sunk out of sight behind them. They were flying over a wild country of steep hills and dark forests, still following the course of the river.

The really big mountains loomed ahead. But the sun was now in the travelers’ eyes and they couldn’t see things very clearly in that direction.

For the sun sank lower and lower till the western sky was all like one great furnace full of melted gold; and it set at last behind a jagged peak which stood up against the brightness as sharp and flat as if it were cut out of cardboard.

“It’s none too warm up here,” said Polly.

“And my wings are beginning to ache,” said Fledge. “There’s no sign of the valley with a Lake in it, like what Aslan said. What about coming down and looking out for a decent spot to spend the night in? We shan’t reach that place tonight.”

“Yes, and surely it’s about time for supper?” said Digory.

So Fledge came lower and lower. As they came down nearer to the earth and among the hills, the air grew warmer and after traveling so many hours with nothing to listen to but the beat of Fledge’s wings, it was nice to hear the homely and earthy noises again—the chatter of the river on its stony bed and the creaking of trees in the light wind.

A warm, good smell of sun-baked earth and grass and flowers came up to them. At last Fledge alighted. Digory rolled off and helped Polly to dismount. Both were glad to stretch their stiff legs.

The valley in which they had come down was in the heart of the mountains; snowy heights, one of them looking rose-red in the reflections of the sunset, towered above them.

“I am hungry,” said Digory.

“Well, tuck in,” said Fledge, taking a big mouthful of grass.

Then he raised his head, still chewing and with bits of grass sticking out on each side of his mouth like whiskers, and said, “Come on, you two. Don’t be shy. There’s plenty for us all.”

“But we can’t eat grass,” said Digory.

“H’m, h’m,” said Fledge, speaking with his mouth full. “Well— h’m— don’t know quite what you’ll do then. Very good grass too.”

Polly and Digory stared at one another in dismay.

“Well, I do think someone might have arranged about our meals,” said Digory.

“I’m sure Aslan would have, if you’d asked him,” said Fledge.

“Wouldn’t he know without being asked?” said Polly.

“I’ve no doubt he would,” said the Horse. “But I’ve a sort of idea he likes to be asked.”

–C.S. Lewis, The Magician’s Nephew: The Chronicles of Narnia (New York: HarperCollins, 1950), 86-87.

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“Forgiveness of sins” by Thomas Watson

“Daily bread may make us live comfortably, but forgiveness of sins will make us die comfortably.”

–Thomas Watson, The Lord’s Prayer  (Carlisle, PA: Banner of Truth Trust, 1662/1999), 211.

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“More than all the world” by Thomas Watson

“The pearl of price, the Lord Jesus, is the quintessence of all good things. To give us Christ is more than if God had given us all the world.

He can make more worlds, but He has no more Christs to bestow.

He is such a golden mine that the angels cannot dig to the bottom (Ephesians 3:8).

From Christ we have justification, adoption, and coronation.

The sea of God’s mercy in giving us Christ should swallow up all our wants.”

–Thomas Watson, The Lord’s Prayer  (Carlisle, PA: Banner of Truth Trust, 1662/1999), 206.

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“As if it were our last” by Thomas Watson

“Our Saviour will have us pray, ‘Give us bread this day,’ to teach us to live every day as if it were our last.”

–Thomas Watson, The Lord’s Prayer  (Carlisle, PA: Banner of Truth Trust, 1662/1999), 202.

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“Strangers and pilgrims” by Ezekiel Hopkins

“After we have prayed for the glory of God, we also make mention of our temporal needs. Spiritual things are our greatest need, but God also allows us temporal blessings. We enjoy them as we might enjoy a visit to an inn.

We refresh ourselves with the comforts there, but we must not remain there or seek our true rest from it. We are strangers and pilgrims upon earth; heaven is our country, and to there we are travelling. We are thankful for the world’s provisions during our journey, and we enjoy the bread we pray for as a support in our passage home.

Our Saviour, in His providence, gives us heavenly blessings as a happy addition to the earthly blessings He daily bestows upon us. We are usually more aware of our temporal needs than of our spiritual, and our Saviour by degrees raises our desires from the one to the other.

We are invited to pray for the supply of our temporal necessities, but these are trivial in regard to the necessities of our souls. We ought to be much more earnest and importunate with God for our spiritual mercies.

Bread can only nourish my vile carcass for a few short years and then it molders into dust, and becomes mean for worms. How much more important it is to seek pardon for my sins and the spiritual mercies without which my soul must eternally perish!

Bread figuratively denotes all provisions necessary for this natural life. They are both needful and God has promised to give them to us. Whatever you enjoy is from His free bounty. He spreads your table and fills your cup. He is your health and strength, and He loads you daily with benefits.

Do you have riches, honour, friends, joy, and comfort? It is God who fills you with these good things. He is the great Lord and proprietor who brings forth abundantly from all His stores for the use and service of man.”

–Ezekiel Hopkins, “On the Lord’s Prayer,” in Works of Ezekiel Hopkins, Ed. Charles Quick (Morgan, PA: Soli Deo Gloria, 1995), 1:98-103. As quoted in Voices From the Past, Ed. Richard Rushing (Carlisle, PA: Banner of Truth, 2009), 179.

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