Tag Archives: Heaven

“Chart and compass” by Thomas Watson

“The Scripture is the chart and compass by which we sail to the new Jerusalem.”

–Thomas Watson, A Body of Divinity Contained in Sermons Upon the Westminster Assembly’s Catechism (Edinburgh: Banner of Truth Trust, 1692/1970), 35.

Leave a comment

Filed under Bible, Christian Theology, Heaven, New Testament, Old Testament, Puritanical, Quotable Quotes, The Gospel, Thomas Watson

“Just to be with Christ is all the heaven a believer wants” by Charles Spurgeon

“Oh, to think of heaven without Christ! It is the same thing as thinking of hell.

Heaven without Christ! It is day without the sun, existing without life, feasting without food, seeing without light. It involves a contradiction in terms.

Heaven without Christ! Absurd. It is the sea without water, the earth without its fields, the heavens without their stars. There cannot be heaven without Christ.

He is the sum total of bliss, the fountain from which heaven flows, the element of which heaven is composed. Christ is heaven and heaven is Christ. You shall change the words and make no difference in the sense.

To be where Jesus is is the highest imaginable bliss, and bliss away from Jesus is inconceivable to the child of God. If you were invited to a marriage feast, and you were yourself to be the bride, and yet the bridegroom were not there– do not tell me about feasting.

In vain they ring the bells till the church tower rocks and reels, in vain the dishes smoke and the red wine sparkles, in vain the guests shout and make merry: if the bride looks around her and sees no bridegroom, the dainties mock her sorrow and the merriment insults her misery.

Such would a Christless heaven be to the saints. If you could gather together all conceivable joys, and Christ were absent, there would be no heaven to His beloved ones. Hence it is that heaven is to be where Christ is.

And, beloved, just to be with Christ is heaven– that bare thing. That bare thing, just to be with Christ is all the heaven a believer wants.

The angels may be there or not, as they will, and the golden crowns and harps present or absent as may be, but if I am to be where Jesus is, I will find angels in His eyes, and crowns in every lock of His hair. To me the golden streets shall be my fellowship with Him, and the harpings of the harpers shall be the sound of His voice.

Only to be near Him, to be with Him– this is all we want. The apostle does not say, ‘to be in heaven, which is far better.’ No, but, ‘to be with Christ; which is far better,’ and he adds no description. He leaves the thoughts just as they are, in all their majestic simplicity. ‘To be with Christ; which is far better.’

But what is it to be with Christ, beloved? In some sense we are with Christ now, for He comes to us. We are no strangers to Him. Even while we are in this body we have communion with Jesus.

And yet it must be true that a higher fellowship is to come, for the apostle says, that while we are present in the body we are absent from the Lord.

There is a sense in which, so long as we are here, we are absent from the Lord. And one great saint used to say upon his birthday that he had been so many years in banishment from the Lord: to abide in this lowland country, so far from the ivory palaces, is a banishment at the very best.

All that we can see of Christ here is through a glass darkly. Face to face is true nearness to Him, and that we have not reached as yet.

What will it be, then, to be with Christ? Excuse me if I say it will be, first of all, exactly what it says, namely, to be with Him. I must repeat that word– it is heaven only to be with Him.

It is not merely what comes out of being with Him: His company itself is heaven.”

–Charles H. Spurgeon, “‘Forever with the Lord,’” in The Metropolitan Tabernacle Pulpit Sermons (vol. 19; London: Passmore & Alabaster, 1873), 19: 570–572.

Leave a comment

Filed under Charles Spurgeon, Christian Theology, Glorification, Glory of Christ, Heaven, Jesus Christ, Preaching, Puritanical, Quotable Quotes, The Gospel, Union with Christ, Worship

“Until the Day Break” by Horatius Bonar

“For the vision of the Bridegroom
Waits the well-beloved Bride,
Severed only for a season
From her Well-beloved’s side.
For the hour when morn ascendeth,
And the shadows disappear,
For the signs of heavenly glory,
She is waiting, waiting here!
Morn of morns, it comes at last,
All the gloom of ages past.
For the day of days the brightest
She is waiting, waiting here!

For the coming of the Bridegroom,
Whom, though yet unseen, we love;
For the King of saints, returning
In His glory from above;
For the shout that shakes the prison,
For the trumpet loud and clear,
For the voice of the archangel,
She is waiting, waiting here!
Morn of morns, it comes at last,
All the gloom of ages past.
For the day of days the brightest
She is waiting, waiting here!

For the light beyond the darkness,
When the reign of sin is done,
When the storm has ceased its raging,
And the haven has been won;
For the joy beyond the sorrow,
Joy of the eternal year,
For the resurrection splendour,
She is waiting, waiting here!
Morn of morns, it comes at last,
All the gloom of ages past.
For the day of days the brightest
She is waiting, waiting here!

For the day of ended battle,
For the victor’s palm and crown,
For the day of recognition,
When the King shall claim His own;
For the day when He who loved her
Shall in glory reappear,
For the day of revelation,
She is waiting, waiting here!
Morn of morns, it comes at last,
All the gloom of ages past.
For the day of days the brightest
She is waiting, waiting here!”

–Horatius Bonar, “Until the Day Break,” in “Until the Day Break,” and Other Hymns and Poems Left Behind (London: Hodder and Stoughton, 1890), 3-5.

Leave a comment

Filed under Christian Theology, Heaven, Hope, Horatius Bonar, Jesus Christ, Psalms, Hymns, and Spiritual Songs, Puritanical, Quotable Quotes, The Church, The Gospel

“The Saviour’s joy” by Charles Spurgeon

“Remember you have given Jesus great joy in His saving you. He was forever with the Father, eternally happy, infinitely glorious, as God over all.

Yet out of boundless love, He came, took upon Himself our nature, and suffered in our stead to bring us back to holiness and God.

‘He layeth it on his shoulders, rejoicing.’ That day the shepherd knew but one joy. He had found his sheep, and the very pressure of it upon his shoulders made his heart light, for he knew by that sign that the object of his care was safe beyond all question.

Now he goes home with it, and this joy of his was then so great that it filled his soul to overflowing. The parable speaks nothing as to his joy in getting home again, nor a word concerning the joy of being saluted by his friends and neighbours.

No, the joy of having found his sheep eclipsed all other gladness of heart, and dimmed the light of home and friendship. He turns round to friends and neighbours and entreats them to help him to bear the weight of his happiness.

He cries, ‘Rejoice with me, for I have found my sheep which was lost.’ One sinner had repented, and all heaven must make holiday concerning it.

Oh, brethren, there is enough joy in the heart of Christ over His saved ones to flood all heaven with delight!

The streets of Paradise run knee-deep with the heavenly waters of the Saviour’s joy. They flow out of the very soul of Christ, and angels and glorified spirits bathe in the mighty stream.

Let us do the same.”

–Charles H. Spurgeon, “The Parable of the Lost Sheep,” in The Metropolitan Tabernacle Pulpit Sermons, Volume 30 (London: Passmore & Alabaster, 1884), 30: 526.

Leave a comment

Filed under Bible, Charles Spurgeon, Christian Theology, Jesus Christ, Joy, Preaching, Puritanical, Quotable Quotes, The Gospel

“We shall have all that His great heart can give us” by Charles Spurgeon

“Jesus says, ‘I go to prepare a place for you.’ (John 14:2) Brethren, He will do it well, for He knows all about us.

He knows what will give us the most happiness,—and what will best develop all our spiritual faculties forever.

He loves us, too, so well that, as the preparing is left to Him, I know that He will prepare us nothing second-rate, nothing that could possibly be excelled.

We shall have the best of the best, and much of it. We shall have all that even His great heart can give us.

Nothing will be stinted, for, as He is preparing it, it will be a right royal and divine preparation.

If, when the prodigal came back to his father, there was the preparation of the fatted calf, and the music and dancing, and the gold ring and the best robe, what will be the preparation when we do not come home as prodigals, but as the bride prepared for her husband, or as the beloved children, without spot, or wrinkle, or any such thing, coming home to the Father who shall see His own image in us, and rejoice over us with singing?

It is a grand place that Christ prepares, for never was there another such a lordly host as He is.

It is a mansion of delights that He prepares, for never was there another architect with thought so magnificent as His, and never were other hands so skilled at quarrying living stones, and putting them one upon another, as His hands have ever been.

This thought ought to cheer us much. It must be something very wonderful that Christ prepares as a fit place for His people.”

–Charles H. Spurgeon, “‘A Prepared Place for a Prepared People,’” in The Metropolitan Tabernacle Pulpit Sermons (vol. 47; London: Passmore & Alabaster, 1901), 47: 519. This sermon has been reprinted in No Tears in Heaven.

Leave a comment

Filed under Charles Spurgeon, Christian Theology, Glory of Christ, Heaven, Jesus Christ, Preaching, Puritanical, Quotable Quotes, The Gospel

“Sitting down at one table” by Herman Bavinck

“The blessedness of communion with God is enjoyed in and heightened by the communion of saints. On earth already this communion is a wonderful benefit of faith.

Those who for Jesus’s sake have left behind house or brothers or sisters or father or mother or wife or children or fields already in this life receive houses, brothers, sisters, mothers, children, and fields—along with persecutions—(Mark 10:29–30), for all who do the will of the Father are Jesus’s brother and sister and mother (Matt. 12:50).

Through the mediator of the New Testament, believers enter into fellowship, not only with the militant church on earth, but also with the triumphant church in heaven, the assembly of the firstborn, the spirits of the righteous made perfect, even with innumerable angels (Heb. 12:22–24).

But this fellowship, though in principle it already exists on earth, will nevertheless be incomparably richer and more glorious when all dividing walls of descent and language, of time and space, have been leveled, all sin and error have been banished, and all the elect have been assembled in the new Jerusalem.

Then will be fully answered the prayer of Jesus that all His sheep may be one flock under one Shepherd (John 10:16; 17:21). All the saints together will then fully comprehend the breadth and length and height and depth of the love of Christ (Eph. 3:18–19).

They will together be filled with all the fullness of God (Eph. 3:19; Col. 2:2, 10), inasmuch as Christ, Himself filled with the fullness of God (Col. 1:19), will in turn fill the believing community with Himself and make it His fullness (πληρωμα, plērōma; Eph. 1:23; 4:10).

And sitting down at one table with Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob (Matt. 8:11), they will unitedly lift up a song of praise to the glory of God and of the Lamb. (Rev. 4:11; 5:12)”

–Herman Bavinck, Reformed Dogmatics: Holy Spirit, Church, and New Creation, Vol. 4, Ed. John Bolt, and Trans. John Vriend, (Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Academic, 2008), 4: 722–723.

Leave a comment

Filed under Biblical Theology, Christian Theology, Communion with God, Eschatology, Glory of Christ, Heaven, Herman Bavinck, Jesus Christ, Kingdom of God, Maranatha, Puritanical, Quotable Quotes, Sanctification, The Church, The Gospel, Worship

“A calm look into the eternal world” by Robert Murray M’Cheyne

“There is nothing like a calm look into the eternal world to teach us the emptiness of human praise, the sinfulness of self-seeking and vainglory, to teach us the preciousness of Christ.”

–Robert Murray M’Cheyne, Memoir and Remains of the Rev. Robert Murray M’Cheyne, Ed. Andrew A. Bonar (Edinburgh: Banner of Truth, 1844/1966), 85.

Leave a comment

Filed under Christian Theology, Heaven, Jesus Christ, Puritanical, Quotable Quotes, Robert Murray M'Cheyne, The Gospel