Tag Archives: Precious and Magnificent Promises

“The firmament of Scripture” by John Newton

“When we pray for increase of faith and grace, and that we may have stronger proofs of our own sincerity, and of the Lord’s faithfulness and care, we do, but in other words, pray for affliction.

He is best known and noticed in the time of trouble, as a present and all-sufficient help. How grand and magnificent is the arch over our heads in a starry night! But if it were always day, the stars could not be seen.

The firmament of Scripture, if I may so speak, is spangled with exceeding great and precious promises, as the sky is with stars, but the value and beauty of many of them are only perceptible to us in the night of affliction…

Oh! For grace to be always ready, always watching, with our loins girded up, and our lamps burning. Then we may cheerfully leave the when, the how, and the where to Him, of whose kind care and attention we have had so many proofs hitherto.

He will be our Guide and our Guard even unto death, and beyond it.

John Newton
25th September 1797″

–John Newton, “Letter LXXIII” in The Aged Pilgrim’s Thoughts Over Sin and the Grave, Illustrated in a Series of Letters to Walter Taylor, Never Before Published, by the Rev. John Newton (London: Baker and Fletcher, 2nd Ed., 1825), 135-136. As quoted in Tony Reinke, Newton on the Christian Life: To Live Is Christ (Wheaton: Crossway, 2015), 189.

Leave a comment

Filed under Bible, Christian Theology, Communion with God, Discipleship, grace, Holiness, Jesus Christ, John Newton, Mercy, Providence, Puritanical, Quotable Quotes, Sanctification, Sin, Suffering, Temptation, The Gospel

“They will bear all the weight we can lay on them” by J.C. Ryle

“Let us mark, lastly, the firm grasp which the Virgin Mary had of Bible promises. She ends her hymn of praise by declaring that God has ‘blessed Israel in remembrance of His mercy,’ and that He has done ‘as He spake to our fathers, to Abraham and his seed forever.’

These words show clearly that she remembered the old promise made to Abraham, ‘In thee shall all nations of the earth be blessed.’ And it is evident that in the approaching birth of her Son she regarded this promise as about to be fulfilled.

Let us learn from this holy woman’s example, to lay firm hold on Bible promises. It is of the deepest importance to our peace to do so.

Promises are, in fact, the manna that we should daily eat, and the water that we should daily drink, as we travel through the wilderness of this world. We see not yet all things put under us. We see not Christ, and heaven, and the book of life and the mansions prepared for us.

We walk by faith, and this faith leans on promises. But on those promises we may lean confidently. They will bear all the weight we can lay on them.

We shall find one day, like the Virgin Mary, that God keeps His word, and that what He has spoken, so He will always in due time perform.”

–J.C. Ryle, Expository Thoughts on Luke, Vol. 1 (New York: Robert Carter & Brothers, 1879), 38. Ryle is commenting on Luke 1:46-56.

Leave a comment

Filed under Bible, Christian Theology, Faith, God the Father, J.C. Ryle, Jesus Christ, Puritanical, Quotable Quotes, The Gospel

“Joy is the fruit of grace” by Charles Spurgeon

“Do not set too much store by your own feelings as evidences of grace. ‘The fruit of the Spirit is joy,’ but you may not at this moment be conscious of joy: trees are not always bearing fruit, and yet their substance is in them when they lose their leaves.

Some young people say, ‘Oh, we know we are saved, because we are so happy.’ It is by no means a sure evidence, for joy may be carnal, unfounded, unspiritual. Certain Christians are afraid that they cannot be in a saved state because they are not joyous, but we are saved by faith and not by joy.

The word of God is a more sure testimony to the soul than all the raptures a man can feel. I would sooner walk in the dark, and hold hard to a promise of my God, than trust in the light of the brightest day that ever dawned.

Precious as the fruit is, do not put the fruit where the root should be. Please to recollect that. Joy is not the root of grace in the soul, it is the fruit, and must not be put out of its proper position.”

–Charles H. Spurgeon, “The Fruit of the Spirit: Joy” in The Metropolitan Tabernacle Pulpit Sermons, vol. 27 (London: Passmore & Alabaster, 1881), 77.

Leave a comment

Filed under Charles Spurgeon, Christian Theology, Jesus Christ, Puritanical, Quotable Quotes, The Gospel

“Divine promises” by Thomas Brooks

“The promises of God are a Christian’s magna charta, his chiefest evidences for heaven. Divine promises are God’s deed of gift; they are the only assurance which the saints have to shew for their right and title to Christ, to His blood, and to all the happiness and blessedness that comes by Him…

The promises are not only the food of faith, but also the very life and soul of faith; they are a mine of rich treasures, a garden full of the choicest and sweetest flowers; in them are wrapt up all celestial contentments and delights.

And this is most certain, that all a Christian’s conclusions of interest in any of those choice and precious privileges which flow from the blood of Jesus Christ ought to be bottomed, grounded, and founded upon the rich and free promises of grace and mercy.”

–Thomas Brooks, “A Cabinet of Jewels,” in The Complete Works of Thomas Brooks, Volume 3, ed. Alexander Balloch Grosart (Edinburgh; London; Dublin: James Nichol; James Nisbet and Co.; G. Herbert, 1866), 254-255.

Leave a comment

Filed under Bible, Christian Theology, Jesus Christ, Puritanical, Quotable Quotes, Reading, Revelation, salvation, Sanctification, The Gospel, Thomas Brooks

“An utter travesty of the Gospel” by D. Martyn Lloyd-Jones

“Here is something which is truly important, and something which is basic and fundamental to the whole Christian position. The order in which these things are put is absolutely vital. The Apostle does not ask us to do anything until he has first of all emphasized and repeated what God has done for us in Christ.

How often have men given the impression that to be Christian means that you display in your life a kind of general belief of faith, and then you add to it virtue and knowledge and charity! To them the Christian message is an exhortation to us to live a certain type of life, and an exhortation to put these things into practice.

But that is an utter travesty of the Gospel. The Christian Gospel in the first instance does not ask us to do anything. It first of all proclaims and announces to us what God has done for us.

The first statement of the Gospel is not an exhortation to action or to conduct and behavior. Before man is called upon to do anything, he must have received something. Before God calls upon a man to put anything into practice, He has made it possible for man to put it into practice.”

— D. Martyn Lloyd-Jones,  Expository Sermons on 2 Peter (Carlisle, PA: Banner of Truth, 1983), 23-24.

1 Comment

Filed under 2 Peter, Christian Theology, D. Martyn Lloyd-Jones, Jesus Christ, Puritanical, Quotable Quotes, The Gospel