Tag Archives: Precious Remedies Against Satan’s Devices

“Mercy is Alpha, Justice is Omega” by Thomas Brooks

“Sins against mercy will bring the greatest and sorest judgments upon men’s heads and hearts. Mercy is Alpha, Justice is Omega. When mercy is despised, then justice takes the throne.

God is like a prince, that sends not His army against rebels before He hath sent His pardon, and proclaimed it by a herald of arms: He first hangs out the white flag of mercy. If this wins men in, they are happy forever; but if they stand out, then God will put forth His red flag of justice and judgment. If the one is despised, the other shall be felt with a witness.”

–Thomas Brooks, “Precious Remedies Against Satan’s Devices,” The Complete Works of Thomas Brooks, Volume 1, ed. Alexander Balloch Grosart (Edinburgh; London; Dublin: James Nichol; James Nisbet and Co.; G. Herbert, 1866), 28.

1 Comment

Filed under Christian Theology, Mercy, Puritanical, Quotable Quotes, The Gospel, Thomas Brooks

“Dwell upon the vanity of all things here below” by Thomas Brooks

“Oh let your souls dwell upon the vanity of all things here below, till your hearts be so thoroughly convinced and persuaded of the vanity of them, as to trample upon them, and make them a footstool for Christ to get up, and ride in a holy triumph in your hearts.

Tell me, you that say all things under the sun are vanity, if you do really believe what you say, why do you spend more thoughts and time on the world, than you do on Christ, heaven, and your immortal souls? Why do you then neglect your duty towards God, to get the world?

Why do you then so eagerly pursue after the world, and are so cold in your pursuing after God, Christ, and holiness? Why then are your hearts so exceedingly raised, when the world comes in, and smiles upon you?

Why are you so much dejected, and cast down, when the world frowns upon you, and with Jonah’s gourd withers before you?”

–Thomas Brooks, The Complete Works of Thomas Brooks, Volume 1, ed. Alexander Balloch Grosart (Edinburgh; London; Dublin: James Nichol; James Nisbet and Co.; G. Herbert, 1866), 64-65.

1 Comment

Filed under Christian Theology, Jesus Christ, Puritanical, Quotable Quotes, Thomas Brooks, Worldliness

“Stir up the soul against sin” by Thomas Brooks

“That Christ should come from the eternal bosom of His Father to a region of sorrow and death; that God should be manifested in the flesh, the Creator made a creature; that He who was clothed with glory should be wrapped with rags of flesh; He who filled heaven and earth with His glory should be cradled in a manger.

That the almighty God should flee from weak man—the God of Israel into Egypt; that the God of the law should be subject to the law, the God of the circumcision circumcised, the God who made the heavens working at Joseph’s homely trade; that He who binds the devils in chains should be tempted.

That He, whose is the world, and the fullness thereof, should hunger and thirst; that the God of strength should be weary, the Judge of all flesh condemned, the God of life put to death; that He who is one with His Father should cry out of misery, ‘My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?’ (Matt. 27:46).

That He who had the keys of hell and death at His belt should lie imprisoned in the sepulcher of another, having in His lifetime nowhere to lay His head, nor after death to lay His body.

That that HEAD, before which the angels do cast down their crowns, should be crowned with thorns, and those EYES, purer than the sun, put out by the darkness of death; those EARS, which hear nothing but hallelujahs of saints and angels, to hear the blasphemies of the multitude.

That FACE, which was fairer than the sons of men, to be spit on by beastly wretched men; that MOUTH and TONGUE, which spoke as never man spoke, accused for blasphemy; those HANDS, which freely swayed the scepter of heaven, nailed to the cross.

Those FEET, ‘like unto fine brass,’ nailed to the cross for man’s sins; each sense pained with a spear and nails; His SMELL, with stinking odor, being crucified on Golgotha, the place of skulls; His TASTE, with vinegar and gall.

His HEARING, with reproaches, and SIGHT of His mother and disciples bemoaning Him; His SOUL, comfortless and forsaken; and all this for those very sins that Satan paints and puts fine colors upon!

Oh! How should the consideration of this stir up the soul against sin, and work the soul to fly from it, and to use all holy means whereby sin may be subdued and destroyed!”

–Thomas Brooks, Precious Remedies Against Satan’s Devices in The Complete Works of Thomas Brooks, Vol. 1, Ed. Alexander B. Grosart (Edinburgh: James Nichol, 1866), 17-18.

Leave a comment

Filed under Christian Theology, Jesus Christ, Puritanical, Quotable Quotes, Sanctification, Sin, The Gospel, Thomas Brooks

“Serious meditating” by Thomas Brooks

“Remember, it is not hasty reading—but serious meditating upon holy and heavenly truths, that make them prove sweet and profitable to the soul. It is not the bee’s touching of the flower, which gathers honey—but her abiding for a time upon the flower, which draws out the sweet. It is not he who reads most—but he who meditates most, who will prove the choicest, sweetest, wisest and strongest Christian.”

–Thomas Brooks, Precious Remedies Against Satan’s Devices in The Complete Works of Thomas Brooks, Vol. 1, Ed. Alexander B. Grosart (Edinburgh: James Nichol, 1866), 8.

1 Comment

Filed under Bible, Christian Theology, Puritanical, Quotable Quotes, Reading, Thomas Brooks