Tag Archives: The Christian Ministry

“Love should pervade the whole tone of our Ministry” by Charles Bridges

“Love is the grand distinctive mark of our office. The Christian Pastor, of all men in the world, should have an affectionate heart.

We set forth a most tender Father, a bleeding Savior, and a faithful Comforter. ‘Speaking the truth in love’ is in a few words the most complete description of our office.

Love should pervade the whole tone of our Ministry.”

–Charles Bridges, The Christian Ministry (Edinburgh: Banner of Truth Trust, 1830/2005), 333, 338.

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“Let Christ be the diamond to shine in all your sermons” by Charles Bridges

“Preach Christ Jesus the Lord. Determine to know nothing among your people, but Christ crucified.

Let His name and grace, His spirit and love, triumph in the midst of all your sermons.

Let your great end be to glorify Him in the heart, to render Him amiable and precious in the eyes of His people, to lead them to Him, as a sanctuary to protect them, a propitiation to reconcile them, a treasure to enrich them, a physician to heal them, an advocate to present them and their services to God, as wisdom to counsel them, as righteousness to justify, as sanctification to renew, as redemption to save.

Let Christ be the diamond to shine in the bosom of all your sermons.”

–Charles Bridges, The Christian Ministry (Edinburgh: Banner of Truth Trust, 1830/2005), 258.

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“Nothing but love from Him” by Charles Spurgeon

“What I have to say lastly is this: how greatly I desire that you who are not yet enlisted in my Lord’s band would come to Him because you see what a kind and gracious Lord He is! Young men, if you could see our Captain, you would down on your knees and beg Him to let you enter the ranks of those who follow Him.

It is heaven to serve Jesus. I am a recruiting sergeant, and I would fain find a few recruits at this moment. Every man must serve somebody: we have no choice as to that fact. Those who have no master are slaves to themselves. Depend upon it, you will either serve Satan or Christ, either self or the Saviour.

You will find sin, self, Satan, and the world to be hard masters; but if you wear the livery of Christ, you will find Him so meek and lowly of heart that you will find rest unto your souls. He is the most magnanimous of captains. There never was His like among the choicest of princes.

He is always to be found in the thickest part of the battle. When the wind blows cold He always takes the bleak side of the hill. The heaviest end of the cross lies ever on His shoulders. If He bids us carry a burden, He carries it also.

If there is anything that is gracious, generous, kind, and tender, yea lavish and superabundant in love, you always find it in Him. These forty years and more have I served Him, blessed be His name! And I have had nothing but love from Him.

I would be glad to continue yet another forty years in the same dear service here below if so it pleased Him. His service is life, peace, joy. Oh, that you would enter on it at once! God help you to enlist under the banner of Jesus even this day! Amen.”

–Charles H. Spurgeon, “The Statue of David for the Sharing of the Spoil,” in The Metropolitan Tabernacle Pulpit Sermons, Vol. XXXVII (London: Passmore & Alabaster, 1891), 323-324. These were the last words Spurgeon ever preached in the pulpit at the Metropolitan Tabernacle in London, delivered on June 7, 1891.

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“Put your heart into your sermon” by Charles Bridges

“The Minister, that does not manifestly put his heart into his sermon, will never put his sermon into the hearts of his people. Pompous elocution, attempts at theatrical display, or affected emotions, are indeed most repugnant to the simple dignity of our office. A painted fire may glare, but will not warm.

Violent agitations, without correspondent tenderness of feeling, will disgust instead of arresting the mind. Preaching is not (as some appear to think it) the work of the lungs, or the mimicry of gesture, or the impulse of uncontrollable feeling; but the spiritual energy of a heart constrained by the love of Christ, and devoted to the care of those immortal souls, for whom Christ died.”

–Charles Bridges, The Christian Ministry (Edinburgh: Banner of Truth Trust, 1830/2005), 320.

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“Believe, wait, and work” by Charles Bridges

“It is faith that enlivens our work with perpetual cheerfulness. It commits every part of it to God, in the hope, that even mistakes shall be overruled for His glory; and thus relieves us from an oppressive anxiety, often attendant upon a deep sense of our responsibility.

The shortest way to peace will be found in casting ourselves upon God for daily pardon of deficiencies and supplies of grace, without looking too eagerly for present fruit. Hence our course of effort is unvarying, but more tranquil. It is peace—not slumber, rest in the work—not from it.

Faith also supports us under the trials of our Ministerial warfare with the clear view of the faithfulness of the covenant, and the stability of the church. And indeed, as all the promises are made to faith, or to the grace springing from it, this is the only spring of Christian courage, and Christian hope.

Unbelief looks at the difficulty. Faith regards the promise… But after all, the grand secret is habitually to have our eye upon Christ. Peter—looking at the waves instead of the Saviour— began to sink.

We too—if we look at the difficulties of our work, and forget the upholding arm of our ever-present Head—shall sink in despondency. Believe—wait— work—are the watchwords of the Ministry.

Believing the promise, gives the power to wait. Waiting supplies strength for work, and such working is not in ‘vain in the Lord.'”

–Charles Bridges, The Christian Ministry (Edinburgh: Banner of Truth Trust, 1830/2005), 178-179.

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“Scatter seed, believe, and wait” by Charles Bridges

“Our plain and cheering duty is therefore to go forward — to scatter the seed, to believe and to wait. Yet must there be expectancy as well as patience.

The warrant of success is assured, not only as regards an outward reformation, but a spiritual change of progressive and universal influence. The fruit of Ministerial labour is not indeed always visible in its symptoms, nor immediate in its results, nor proportioned to the culture.

Faith and patience will be exercised — sometimes severely so. But after a painstaking, weeping seed-time, we shall bring our sheaves with rejoicing, and lay them upon the altar of God, ‘that the offering up of them might be acceptable, being sanctified by the Holy Ghost.’

Meanwhile we must beware of saying— ‘Let him make speed, and hasten his work that we may see it.’ The measure and the time are with the Lord. We must let Him alone with His own work.

Ours is the care of service — His is the care of success. The Lord of the harvest must determine when, and what, and where the harvest shall be.”

–Charles Bridges, The Christian Ministry (Edinburgh: Banner of Truth Trust, 1830/2005), 76.

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“Our library and our understanding” by Charles Bridges

“It is far more easy to furnish our library than our understanding.”

–Charles Bridges, The Christian Ministry (Edinburgh: Banner of Truth Trust, 1830/2005), 46.

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