Tag Archives: The Loveliness of Christ

“There is no love so great and so wonderful as that which is in the heart of Christ” by Jonathan Edwards

“There is no love so great and so wonderful as that which is in the heart of Christ.

He is one that delights in mercy.

He is ready to pity those that are in suffering and sorrowful circumstances.

He is one that delights in the happiness of His creatures.

The love and grace that Christ has manifested does as much exceed all that which is in this world as the sun is brighter than a candle.

Parents are often full of kindness towards their children, but there is no kindness like Jesus Christ’s.”

–Jonathan Edwards, “Children Ought to Love the Lord Jesus Christ Above All (Matthew 10:37)” in Sermons and Discourses, 1739–1742 (ed. Harry S. Stout, Nathan O. Hatch, and Kyle P. Farley; vol. 22; The Works of Jonathan Edwards; New Haven, CT; London: Yale University Press, 2003), 22: 171.

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“He is bread to the hungry, water to the thirsty, a garment to the naked, healing to the wounded” by John Flavel

“There is nothing unlovely found in Him, so all that is in Him is wholly lovely. As every ray of God is precious, so everything that is in Christ is precious: Who can weigh Christ in a pair of balances, and tell you what His worth is?

He is comprehensive of all things that are lovely: He seals up the sum of all loveliness. Things that shine as single stars with a particular glory all meet in Christ as a glorious constellation. ‘It pleased the Father that in him should all fullness dwell,’ (Col. 1:19).

Cast your eyes among all created beings, survey the universe, observe strength in one, beauty in a second, faithfulness in a third, wisdom in a fourth; but you shall find none excelling in them all as Christ does.

He is bread to the hungry, water to the thirsty, a garment to the naked, healing to the wounded; and whatever a soul can desire is found in Him (1 Cor. 1:30).”

–John Flavel, The Whole Works of the Reverend John Flavel Volume 2 (London; Edinburgh; Dublin: W. Baynes and Son; Waugh and Innes; M. Keene, 1820), 2: 216.

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“Yet I long for more” by Samuel Rutherford

“I counsel you to think highly of Christ, and of free, free grace, more than ye did before; for I know that Christ is not known amongst us. I think that I see more of Christ than ever I saw; and yet I see but little of what may be seen.

Oh that He would draw back the curtains, and that the King would come out of His gallery and His palace, that I might see Him! Christ’s love is young glory and young heaven; it would soften hell’s pain to be filled with it.

What would I refuse to suffer, if I could get but a draught of love at my heart’s desire! Oh, what price can be given for Him. Angels cannot weigh Him.

Oh, His weight, His worth, His sweetness, His overpassing beauty! If men and angels would come and look to that great and princely One, their ebbness could never take up His depth, their narrowness could never comprehend His breadth, height, and length.

If ten thousand thousand worlds of angels were created, they might all tire themselves in wondering at His beauty, and begin again to wonder of new.

Oh that I could come nigh Him, to kiss His feet, to hear His voice, to feel the smell of His ointments! But oh, alas! I have little, little of Him.

Yet I long for more.”

–Samuel Rutherford, “Letter CLXXV,” Letters of Samuel Rutherford (Carlisle, PA: Banner of Truth, 1664/2012), 331.

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“Live much in the smiles of God” by Robert Murray M’Cheyne

“Learn much of your own heart; and when you have learned all you can, remember you have seen but a few yards into a pit that is unfathomable.

‘The heart is deceitful above all things, and desperately wicked: who can know it?’ Jeremiah 17:9.

Learn much of the Lord Jesus. For every look at yourself, take ten looks at Christ. He is altogether lovely. Such infinite majesty, and yet such meekness and grace, and all for sinners, even the chief!

Live much in the smiles of God. Bask in His beams. Feel His all-seeing eye settled on you in love, and repose in His almighty arms.

Cry after divine knowledge, and lift up your voice for understanding. Seek her as silver, and search for her as for hid treasure, according to the word in Proverbs 2:4.

See that Proverbs 2:10 be fulfilled in you. Let wisdom enter into your hearts, and knowledge be pleasant to thy soul; so you will be delivered from the snares mentioned in the following verses.

Let your soul be filled with a heart-ravishing sense of the sweetness and excellency of Christ and all that is in Him.

Let the Holy Spirit fill every chamber of your heart; and so there will be no room for folly, or the world, or Satan, or the flesh.

I must now commend you all to God and the word of His grace. My dear people are just assembled for worship.

Alas! I cannot preach to them tonight. I can only carry them and you on my heart to the throne of grace. Write me soon.

Ever yours,

Robert Murray M’Cheyne”

–Robert Murray McCheyne, “Letter to Mr. George Shaw of Belfast (9/16/1840)” in Memoir and Remains of the Rev. Robert Murray McCheyne, Ed. Andrew A. Bonar (Edinburgh; London: Oliphant Anderson & Ferrier, 1894), 252.

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“Rejoice continually in Jesus” by John Newton

“Blessed be God, though we must feel hourly cause for shame and humiliation for what we are in ourselves, we have cause to rejoice continually in Christ Jesus.

He is revealed unto us under the various names, characters, relations, and offices, which He bears in the Scripture, and He holds out to our faith a balm for every wound, a cordial for every discouragement, and a sufficient answer to every objection which sin or Satan can suggest against our peace.

If we are guilty, He is our Righteousness. If we are sick, He is our infallible Physician. If we are weak, helpless, and defenceless, He is the compassionate and faithful Shepherd who has taken charge of us. And He will not suffer any thing to disappoint our hopes, or to separate us from His love.

He knows our frame, He remembers that we are but dust, and He has engaged to guide us by His counsel, support us by His power, and at length, to receive us to His glory, that we may be with Him for ever.”

–John Newton, “Letter III,” in The Works of the John Newton, Volume 1, Ed. Richard Cecil (London: Hamilton, Adams & Co., 1824), 439.

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“Christ has infinite loveliness” by Jonathan Edwards

“Christ loved us when there was no loveliness to draw His love. There was nothing attractive to be seen in us. All was abominable to His pure eyes. But Christ has infinite loveliness to win and draw our love.

He is the brightness of God’s glory. He is the bright and morning star in the spiritual firmament. He is more excellent than the angels of heaven.

He is amongst them for amiable and divine beauty, as the sun is among the stars. In beholding His beauty, the angels do day and night entertain and feast their souls and in celebrating of it do they continually employ their praises.

Nor yet have the songs of angels ever declared all the excellency of Jesus Christ, for it is beyond their songs and beyond the thoughts of those bright intelligencies to reach it.

That blessed society above has been continually employed in this work of meditating on and describing the beauty and amiableness of the Son of God, but they have never yet nor ever will comprehend it or fully declare it.

His excellency is such that beholding and enjoying it will yield a soul-satisfying delight. There will be more delight and pleasure in one hour than this world with all that it has can afford in seventy years.”

–Jonathan Edwards, “There Never Was Any Love That Could Be Paralleled with the Dying Love of Christ” in The Blessing of God: Previously Unpublished Sermons of Jonathan Edwards, Ed. Michael D. McMullen (Nashville: Broadman and Holman, 2003), 292.

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