Tag Archives: The unsearchable riches of Christ

“The fruit of free grace” by Thomas Brooks

“Look upon all that you have received, and all that you shall hereafter receive, as the fruit of free grace.

Look upon thy adoption, and write this motto, This is the fruit of free grace.

Look upon thy justification, and write this motto, This is the fruit of free grace.

Look upon all thy graces, and write, These are the fruits of free grace.

Look upon thy experiences, and write, These are the fruits of free grace.

Look upon thy strength to withstand temptations, and write, This is the fruit of free grace.

Look upon divine power to conquer corruptions, and write, This is the fruit of free grace.

Look upon the bread thou eatest, the beer thou drinkest, the clothes thou wearest, and write, These are the fruits of free grace.

1 Cor. 4:7, ‘Who maketh thee to differ from another? and what hast thou that thou hast not received? and if thou hast received it, why dost thou glory as though thou hadst not received it? Who maketh thee to differ?’

This age is full of such proud monsters, but an humble soul sees free grace to be the spring and fountain of all his mercies and comforts. He writes free grace upon all his temporals, and upon all his spirituals.”

–Thomas Brooks, The Unsearchable Riches of Christ, in The Complete Works of Thomas Brooks, ed. Alexander Balloch Grosart, vol. 3 (Edinburgh; London; Dublin: James Nichol; James Nisbet and Co.; G. Herbert, 1661/1866), 39.

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“Preach Christ” by Thomas Brooks

“It is the great work and duty of ministers to preach Jesus Christ to the people because that is the only way to save and to win souls to Jesus Christ. There is no other way of winning and saving souls, but by the preaching of Christ to the people.

In Acts 4:10–12 compared, ‘Neither is there salvation in any other: for there is none other name under heaven given among men, whereby we must be saved.’ You may preach this and that, and a thousand things to the people, and yet never better them, never win them.

It is only preaching of Christ, that allures and draws souls to Christ: John 17:3, ‘This is life eternal, to know thee the only true God, and Jesus Christ whom thou hast sent.’ Ah, nothing melts the hearts of sinners, nor wins upon the hearts of sinners, like the preaching of the Lord Jesus.

It is true, the teaching of this and that opinion, may please many a man’s fancy, but it is only the preaching of Christ that changes the heart, that conquers the heart, that turns the heart. Peter, by preaching of a crucified Christ, converts three thousand souls at once, Acts 2:14–42.

Were Christ more preached, men would be more enamoured with him. He is only precious to them that hear of him, and that believe in him. Christ is in all respects incomparable; and therefore, as you would honour him, and win upon others, make him more and more known to the world, 1 Peter 2:7.”

–Thomas Brooks, “The Unsearchable Riches of Christ,” in The Complete Works of Thomas Brooks, Volume 3, ed. Alexander Balloch Grosart (Edinburgh; London; Dublin: James Nichol; James Nisbet and Co.; G. Herbert, 1866), 208.

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“He is worth more than a thousand worlds” by Thomas Brooks

“Sinners, don’t you deceive your own souls: sin and your souls must part, or Christ and your souls can never meet. Sin and your souls must be two, or Christ and your souls can never be one.

Christ is a most precious commodity; He is better than rubies, Prov. 8:11, or the most costly pearls. And you must part with your old gold, with your shining gold, your old sins, your most shining sins, or you must perish forever.

Christ is to be sought and bought with any pains, at any price. We cannot buy this gold too dear. He is a jewel worth more than a thousand worlds, as all know that have Him. Get Him, and get all; miss Him and miss all.”

–Thomas Brooks, “The Unsearchable Riches of Christ,” in The Complete Works of Thomas Brooks, Volume 3, ed. Alexander Balloch Grosart (Edinburgh; London; Dublin: James Nichol; James Nisbet and Co.; G. Herbert, 1866), 203.

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“The condescending love of God” by Thomas Brooks

“Doth the Lord give the best and greatest gifts to His people? Then you that are His people, sit down and wonder at this condescending love of God.

Oh! What is in thy soul or in my soul, that should cause the Lord to give such gifts to us as He hath given? We were all equal in sin and misery; nay, doubtless, we have actually outsinned thousands, to whom these precious gifts are denied.

Let us therefore sit down and wonder at this condescending love of God.

Oh! We were once poor wretches sitting upon the dunghill, yea, wallowing in our blood, and yet behold the King of kings, the Lord of lords, hath so far condescended in His love, as to bestow Himself, His Spirit, His grace, and all the jewels of His royal crown upon us.

Oh! What heart can conceive, what tongue can express, this matchless love! ‘I will be thine forever,’ says Christ, and ‘My Spirit shall be thine forever,’ and ‘My grace shall be thine forever,’ and ‘My glory shall be thine forever,’ and ‘My righteousness shall be thine forever.’ ‘All I am and all I have, shall be thine forever.’

O sirs! What condescending love is this! Oh! What a Christ is this!”

–Thomas Brooks, “The Unsearchable Riches of Christ,” The Complete Works of Thomas Brooks, Volume 3, ed. Alexander Balloch Grosart (Edinburgh; London; Dublin: James Nichol; James Nisbet and Co.; G. Herbert, 1866), 117.

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“On His heart from all eternity” by Thomas Brooks

“The greatest design of Christ in this world is mightily to endear the hearts of His people; and indeed it was that which was in His eye and upon His heart from all eternity.

It was this design that caused Him to lay down His crown and to take up our cross, to put off His robes and to put on our rags, to be condemned that we might be justified, to undergo the wrath of the Almighty that we might for ever be in the arms of His mercy.

He gives His Spirit, His grace, yea, and His very self, and all to endear the hearts of His people to Himself. When Isaac would endear the heart of Rebekah, then the bracelets, the jewels, and the earrings are cast into her bosom, Gen. 24:53.

So the Lord Jesus casts His heavenly bracelets, jewels, and earrings into the bosoms, into the laps, of His people, out of a design to endear Himself unto them.

Proverbs 17:8, ‘A gift is a precious stone in the eyes of him that hath it; whithersoever it turneth, it prospereth.’ In the Hebrew it is thus, ‘a gift is as a stone of grace,’ אבן־חן, that is, it makes a man very acceptable and gracious in the eyes of others.

Certainly the gifts that Jesus Christ gives to His do render Him very acceptable and precious in their eyes. Christ to them is the crown of crowns, the heaven of heavens, the glory of glories; He is the most sparkling diamond in the ring of glory.

Proverbs 18:16, ‘A man’s gift maketh room for him, and bringeth him before great men.’ The gifts that Jesus Christ gives widen the heart and enlarge the soul of a believer to take in more of Himself.

Naturally we are narrow-mouthed heavenward and wide-mouthed earthward; but the Lord Jesus, by casting in His jewels, His pearls, His precious gifts, into the soul, doth widen the soul, and enlarge the soul, and make it more capacious to entertain Himself.

Christ by His gifts causes all doors to stand open, that ‘the King of glory may enter in,’ Psalm 24:7–10.”

–Thomas Brooks, “The Unsearchable Riches of Christ,” The Complete Works of Thomas Brooks, Volume 3, ed. Alexander Balloch Grosart (Edinburgh; London; Dublin: James Nichol; James Nisbet and Co.; G. Herbert, 1866), 114.

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“Nothing humbles like mercy” by Thomas Brooks

“Mercies make a humble soul glad, but not proud. A humble soul is lowest when his mercies are highest; he is least when he is greatest; he is lowest when he is highest; he is most poor when he is most rich.

Nothing melts like mercy, nothing draws like mercy, nothing humbles like mercy. The voice of mercy is, ‘Remember what lately thou wert, and what now thou art, and be humble.'”

–Thomas Brooks, “The Unsearchable Riches of Christ,” in The Complete Works of Thomas Brooks, Volume 3, ed. Alexander Balloch Grosart (Edinburgh; London; Dublin: James Nichol; James Nisbet and Co.; G. Herbert, 1866), 11.

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“A spotless, pure, complete, and incomparable righteousness” by Thomas Brooks

“A second property of an humble soul is this, He overlooks his own righteousness, and lives upon the righteousness of another, to wit, the Lord Jesus. So the apostle, (Philip. 3:8–10), overlooks his own righteousness, and lives wholly upon the righteousness of Christ: ‘I desire to be found in him,’ saith he, ‘not having mine own righteousness.’

Away with it, it is dross, it is dung, it is dog’s meat! It is a rotten righteousness, an imperfect righteousness, a weak righteousness, ‘which is of the law; but that which is through the faith of Christ, the righteousness which is of God by faith,’ that is a spotless righteousness, a pure righteousness, a complete righteousness, an incomparable righteousness; and, therefore, an humble soul overlooks his own righteousness, and lives upon Christ’s righteousness.

Remember this, all the sighing, mourning, sobbing, and complaining in the world, doth not so undeniably evidence a man to be humble, as his overlooking his own righteousness, and living really and purely upon the righteousness of Christ. This is the greatest demonstration of humility that can be shewn by man, (Mat. 6:8).

Men may do much, hear much, pray much, fast much, and give much, &c., and yet be as proud as Lucifer, as you may see in the Scribes, Pharisees, Mat. 23, and those in Isa, 58:3, who in the pride of their hearts made an idol of their own righteousness: ‘Wherefore have we fasted,’ say they, ‘and thou seest it not? wherefore have we afflicted our souls, and thou takest no knowledge?’

Oh! but for a man now to trample upon his own righteousness, and to live wholly upon the righteousness of another, this speaks out a man to be humble indeed. There is nothing that the heart of man stands more averse to than this, of coming off from his own righteousness.

Man is a creature apt to warm himself with the sparks of his own fire, though he doth lie down for it in eternal sorrow, Isa. 50:11. Man is naturally prone to go about to establish his own righteousness, that he might not subject to the righteousness of Christ; he will labour as for life, to lift up his own righteousness, and to make a saviour of it, Rom. 10:4.

Ay, but an humble soul disclaims his own righteousness: ‘All our righteousness is as filthy rags.’ ‘Enter not into judgment with thy servant, for in thy sight shall no man living be justified,’ Ps. 143:2. So Job, ‘Though I were righteous, yet I would not answer, but I would make supplication to my judge,’ Job 9:15.

Proud Pharisees bless themselves in their own righteousness: ‘I thank God I am not as this publican; I fast twice in the week,’ &c., Luke 18:11, 12. Ay, but now a soul truly humbled blushes to see his own righteousness, and glories in this, that he has the righteousness of Christ to live upon.2 Rev. 4:10, 11, the twenty-four elders throw down their crowns at the feet of Christ.

By their crowns you may understand their gifts, their excellencies, their righteousness; they throw down these before Christ’s throne, to note to us, that they did not put confidence in them, and that Christ was the crown of crowns and the top of all their royalty and glory. An humble soul looks upon Christ’s righteousness as his only crown.”

–Thomas Brooks, “The Unsearchable Riches of Christ,” in The Complete Works of Thomas Brooks, Volume 3, ed. Alexander Balloch Grosart (Edinburgh; London; Dublin: James Nichol; James Nisbet and Co.; G. Herbert, 1866), 11-12.

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