Tag Archives: Works of Jonathan Edwards

“Every Christian family ought to be a little church” by Jonathan Edwards

“Every Christian family ought to be as it were a little church, consecrated to Christ, and wholly influenced and governed by His rules.”

–Jonathan Edwards, “A Farewell Sermon Preached at the First Precinct in Northampton, after the People’s Public Rejection of Their Minister … on June 22, 1750,” in Sermons and Discourses, 1743–1758 (ed. Wilson H. Kimnach and Harry S. Stout; vol. 25; The Works of Jonathan Edwards; New Haven; London: Yale University Press, 2006), 25: 484.

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“Follow Christ as a little, poor, helpless child, taking hold of His hand” by Jonathan Edwards

“In all your course, walk with God and follow Christ as a little, poor, helpless child, taking hold of Christ’s hand, keeping your eye on the mark of the wounds on His hands and side, whence came the blood that cleanses you from sin and hiding your nakedness under the skirt of the white shining robe of His righteousness.”

–Jonathan Edwards, Letters and Personal Writings (ed. George S. Claghorn and Harry S. Stout; vol. 16; The Works of Jonathan Edwards; New Haven; London: Yale University Press, 1998), 16: 90–91. Edwards wrote this advice to Deborah Hatheway, an eighteen-year-old new convert to Christ who was without a pastor, in a letter of counsel on June 3, 1741.

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“The deliverance which we have by Christ is infinitely greater” by Jonathan Edwards

“The gospel of Christ contains joyful tidings to men of deliverance from evil.

It is a proclamation of deliverance to the children of men from evils that are by far the greatest that ever mankind are exposed to: evils that are truly infinitely dreadful, such as the guilt of sin, captivity and bondage to Satan, the wrath of God and perfect and everlasting ruin and misery.

If we compare these things with things that are infinitely less in degree, it may serve to give us some idea of the joyfulness of these tidings.

We may conceive something of the joy that would arise in the heart of one that had wandered deep into a desolate wilderness, and who should hear the voice of a dear friend that is come to seek him, calling to him.

Or if a company were shipwrecked in the midst of the wide ocean, and suddenly saw a ship approaching them.

Or if one had been taken captive and was in the hands of most cruel savages at a great distance from all his friends, and saw himself devoted by them as a sacrifice to their cruelty and then a valiant and victorious deliverer should appear for his rescue.

But the deliverance which we have by Christ is infinitely greater.”

–Jonathan Edwards, “Of Those Who Walk In The Light Of God’s Countenance” in Sermons and Discourses, 1743-1758, The Works of Jonathan Edwards, Vol. 25. Ed. Wilson H. Kimnach (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2006), 702, 703-704.

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“Christ Jesus loves us so much” by Jonathan Edwards

“In the gospel God is come down to us, and the person of God may receive communications of happiness from us. The man Christ Jesus loves us so much, that He is really the happier for our delight and happiness in Him.”

–Jonathan Edwards, “97 – Happiness,” in The “Miscellanies”: Entry Nos. a-z, aa-zz, 1-500, in The Works of Jonathan Edwards, Vol. 13, Ed. Harry S. Stout (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1994), 264.

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“Every atom in the universe is managed by Christ” by Jonathan Edwards

“By virtue of the believer’s union with Christ, he doth really possess all things. That we know plainly from Scripture (1 Cor. 3:21-23). But it may be asked, how doth he possess all things? What is he the better for it? How is a true Christian so much richer than other men?

To answer this, I’ll tell you what I mean by ‘possessing all things.’ I mean that God three in one, all that He is, and all that He has, and all that He does, all that He has made or done—the whole universe, bodies and spirits, earth and heaven, angels, men and devils, sun, moon, and stars, land and sea, fish and fowls, all the silver and gold, kings and potentates as well as mean men—are as much the Christian’s as the money in his pocket, the clothes he wears, or the house he dwells in, or the victuals he eats, yea more properly his, more advantageously more his, than if he could command all those things mentioned to be just in all respects as he pleased at any time, by virtue of the union with Christ, because Christ, who certainly doth thus possess all things, is entirely his, so that he possesses it all, more than a wife the share of the best and dearest husband, more than the hand possesses what the head doth. It is all his.

The universe is his, only he has not the trouble of managing of it. But Christ, to whom it is no trouble, manages it for him a thousand times as much to his advantage as he could himself if he had the managing of all.

Every atom in the universe is managed by Christ so as to be most to the advantage of the Christian, every particle of air or every ray of the sun, so that he in the other world, when he comes to see it, shall sit and enjoy all this vast inheritance with surprising, amazing joy.”

–Jonathan Edwards, “ff – Union with Christ,” in The “Miscellanies”: Entry Nos. a-z, aa-zz, 1-500, in The Works of Jonathan Edwards, Vol. 13, Ed. Harry S. Stout (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1994), 183-184.

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“The most beautiful and glorious object in the world” by Jonathan Edwards

“Another property of light is to be beautiful and pleasant to behold. How dreadful is it to be in horrid darkness, how horrible is it to nature; and how pleasing is the light, how agreeable is it to the eyes.

Men manifest it as soon as they are born: how glorious and beautiful is the sun to behold; what a dismal, gloomy, dreadful place would this world be if it were not for the light. What is more beautiful and glorious that can be beheld with bodily eyes than the light?

So, likewise, Jesus Christ is infinitely the most beautiful and glorious object in the world. When the soul is enlightened by Christ to behold Him, the soul is greatly delighted with the sight of Him, as a little infant is delighted when gazing at the light.

‘Tis a far more pleasant thing to behold Jesus Christ than to look on the sun in his meridian glory, for Jesus Christ is an infinite excellency and beauty.”

–Jonathan Edwards, “Christ, the Light of the World,” in Sermons and Discourses 1720-1723, The Works of Jonathan Edwards, Vol. 10, Ed. Wilson H. Kimnach (New Haven: Yale, 1992), 539. Edwards was 18 years old when he preached this sermon. It may be read here in its entirety.

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“When the glorious morning comes” by Jonathan Edwards

“Is Christ Jesus the light of the world? What glorious times will those be when all nations shall submit themselves to Him, when this glorious light shall shine into every dark corner of the earth, and shall shine much more brightly and gloriously than ever before.

It will be like the rising of the sun after a long night of darkness, after the thick darkness had been ruling and reigning over all nations and poor mankind had been groping about in gross darkness for many ages.

When this glorious morning comes, then those that never saw light before shall see it and be astonished at its glory.

Then the world, which has been in a kind of dead sleep for this many ages, shall rouse up and begin to open their eyes and look forth to behold this glorious light of the world.

Then will the sweet music of God’s praises begin to be heard.”

–Jonathan Edwards, “Christ, the Light of the World,” in Sermons and Discourses 1720-1723, The Works of Jonathan Edwards, Vol. 10, Ed. Wilson H. Kimnach (New Haven: Yale, 1992), 544. Edwards was 18 years old when he preached this sermon. It may be read here in its entirety.

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